How much do you praise people? And how do you praise people?

Advertisements

Smiling exercise

Try this exercise with another person at work or at home. I guarantee it is good for your health ūüėČ

How can we create better learning environments?

Book: Lernumgebungen. Erziehungswissenschaftliche Perspektiven auf Schulgebäude und Klassenzimmer. Edited by Ulrike Stadler-Altmann.
Additional research added / included in this blog posting.

What are examples of advice for architects / designers of better learning environments?

  • Pages 13, 29 and 123: It is important that architects work on discovering needs users have and involve users in creating / designing learning landscapes that meet the needs of users. To involve users, workshops and various social media platforms can be used.
  • Page 17: Use relevant designs and colors, so students will love their learning environments / school buildings. Create / develop school building fa√ßades in ways that make them become interaction partners for people.
  • Page 24: Create green areas, cafes, babbling brooks, theatre rooms, libraries and versatile rooms that are comfortable for people to work / learn in.
  • Page 26: Natural wood usually appears warmer than glass and steel. In addition, the wall colors red and or yellow appear warm, blue and white or gray rather cold. Plants, curtains, carpets and furniture also help create a warm environment.
  • Page 64: Encourage people to use their own electronic devices and decide where they want to learn. That creates ownership which is important.
  • Page 76: Place a “wonder tree” in a central location at the school / university. Invite all students and teachers to “hang up” questions and answers to questions in the tree.
  • Page 103-104: Learning strategies and teaching methods suggest the need for a new form of learning environment characterized by both individual and small-group activities in different physical locations using different media.
  • Page 105: Ideas by students and teachers from a school design challenge included a more colorful environment, extensive use of the outdoors and garden areas, space for tutors and an environment that was open and inviting.
  • Page 106: An “L” shaped room provide flexibility for teachers in managing space and setting up learning centers. It is also useful for allowing a variety of teaching methods – including team teaching and encouraging small groups to work independently. An “L” shaped room also encourages increased teacher movement resulting in more teacher- student contact, more positive student attitude and enhanced learning.
  • Page 116: Flexibility is increasingly important. Use, for example, furniture that can easily be moved around and combined in new ways. Also use mobile walls / whiteboards.
  • Page 129-131 Think of the school as a small city and the city as a big school. Open up the school to the community. Invite people across communities to learn with students and teachers.
  • Page 148: Reduce noise in rooms, for example by placing noise reduction panels on walls and ceilings.

Additional research about learning environments.

Does it pay off to invest in the development of learning spaces?

  • Page 27: Coloring, lighting, air quality, sound quality, furniture and food supply significantly impact moods, well-being and learning performance of people.
  • Pages 28 and 123: Studies show that school environments, which have been positively experienced by students – including architecture, coloring, schoolyard design, decorations etc. – are associated with less school-vandalistic activities.
  • Page 28: Classrooms with windows and “warm” lighting lower the rate of illness of learners.
  • Page 33: Variety, flexibility and open learning spaces are assumed to afford individualized or student-centered practice.
  • Page 43: Teachers view spacious rooms, digital projectors and flexibility as important to improve teaching.
  • Page 55: Beautifully designed rooms have positive effects on attention and the feeling of group affiliation, thus facilitating participation.
  • Page 56: When a teacher plans and arranges the design of tables and chairs prior to a learning event, he / she can facilitate individual work and / or work in groups – thereby increasing learning efficiency.
  • Page 117: A building, which is not rectangular, does not cost more than a rectangular building. The important question is how creatively search for new solutions.

#eduhubdays18

The topic of #eduhubdays18 is collaboratively shaping the future of education. Thinking about the power of social media and other digital platform for enabling dialogues, learning from each other and building communities, a thought that naturally came to me was facilitating a session related to the use of one or more  technologies that have a positive impact on how we work and learn with each other.

Reflecting on what topic to facilitate a session about, I realize that between November 23rd, when I signed up to participate at the event, and today, my thoughts have moved a little away from technology. Why? I think that partly, the reason is that – in contrast to many other events that I participated at in other communities – I experienced that relatively few people, who participated at eduhub days I participated at in the past, use Twitter to share knowledge / ideas with each other before, during, and/or after the event.

So what I have in mind for an  #eduhubdays18 session is one that focuses less on technology and more on human values. During this session, I would like to help participants discover values they have. To do that, I plan to suggest to participants to use the questions below. More concretely, I will invite participants to 1) get together in groups of two people, 2) ask each other some or all of the questions, and 3) help each other extract the most important values of each person which result from the dialogues.

The reason why I publish this posting well in advance of  #eduhubdays18 is that I would like to give you the opportunity to reflect on the topic and, if you are interested, communicate with others about values. In flipping this session, I also welcome you to reach out with any ideas you may have that can improve the session.

Greetings to you all,

Frank

What does a person, who works for a supermarket, do when he or she has an idea?

At an interesting event a few weeks ago about the future of retail, I learned about some of the effects that digitization has on, for example, supermarkets. I was somewhat surprised to hear that when a person, who works for a Migros supermarket, has an idea, he or she goes to the store manager and communicates the idea to him or her. The store manager then decides what is going to happen with that idea. Being curious about how such an  innovation process works at COOP, I asked a person, who works for a COOP retail store. I was told that this particular innovation process works more or less in a similar way. When a person, who works for a certain COOP supermarket, has an idea, he or he communicates the idea to the store manager. The store manager then decides what is going to happen with that idea.

Reflecting on what I learned during the events mentioned above and reflecting on aspects related to retail innovation. two strategic dilemmas come into my mind: The strategic dilemma efficiency vs. creativity and the strategic dilemma planning vs. testing / trying ideas out.

Regarding the strategic dilemma efficiency vs. creativity, I understood that supermarket chains have a relatively strong focus on efficiency. For example, I learned that people, who work for a COOP supermarket on a certain day, meet for 5 minutes in the morning to bring up whatever they have on their mind, for example ideas to improve things. I understood that, for various reasons such as the focus being a lot more on eficiency than on creativity, few ideas are brought forward.  At this event I learned that at Migros things work somewhat similarly. Although anyone can communicate ideas through Migipedia and/or other social media, I understood that, traditionally, people often follow the hierarchical way when they have a wish to change things. And as the focus is a lot more on efficiency than on creativity, few ideas are brought forward.

When it comes to the strategic dilemma planning vs. testing / trying ideas out, I learned that supermarket chains have a relatively strong focus on planning. Also, I learned that most planning is mostly done centrally. And people, who work for a certain supermarket, hardly test / try out ideas they have, for example ideas that they think could improve the experience for people who use that particular retail store. Instead, they follow plans developed centrally.

Gesundheit Brainstorming #DigitalDay

Am¬†#DigitalDay freue ich mich sehr bei diesem¬† Gesundheit Brainstorming mitzumachen. Als ich mich zum kreativen Event vorbereitet habe, sind mir diese f√ľnf Ideen in den Sinn gekommen:

  1. Soziale Medien wie beispielsweise WhatsApp, Skype, Twitter und Blogs nutzen um Menschen zu helfen. Warum? Beispielsweise weil es helfen kann Kooperation zwischen Menschen zu stärken.
  2. Das ada health app und/oder andere health companion apps anwenden. Das ada app habe ich ein paar Mal getestet Рwegen einer gesundheitlichen Herausforderung von mir selber sowie von einer anderen Person. Beide Male wurde ich via das App gut geholfen.
  3. Gesundheitsversicherungsfirmen und R√ľckversicherungsfirmen investieren in¬† die Entwicklung von Infrastruktur in St√§dten, welche f√∂rdern kann, dass es f√ľr Menschen einfacher wird unsere K√∂rper zu trainieren. Beispiele: Outdoor Fitness Tools.
  4. Ein Testspital machen, z.B. mit folgenden Zielen: A. Technologien wie z.B. Roboter testen. B. Patienten und Patientinnen weiterbilden. C. Gesundheitsfachpersonen weiterbilden.
  5. Einander helfen liebevoll miteinander umzugehen.

Hello robot

I look forward to participating at #DigitalDay on November 21st. One of the topics I find fascinating about the time we live in is the use of robots.

On page 65 of this report, I learned that an increasing number of people will be helped / served by robots. And reading this article, I learned about 3 classes of robots: Class 1 robots replace humans at work in dirty, hazardous environments and tedious operations. Class 2 robots operate closely with humans to alleviate incommodity or to increase comfort, such as entertainment, assisting the elderly or carrying patients. Class 3 robots operate humans. Examples are medical robots robots for diagnosis surgery, treatment, and rehabilitation.

Regarding class 1 robots, I look forward to seeing this cleaning robot at work at Z√ľrich main station. Concerning class 2 robots, I look forward to chat with Pepper during #DigitalDay.¬† On this thread with Daniela Lozza and Clare Thomson, I was happy to be able to prepare a little for the #DigitalDay event. I learned, for example, that Pepper is just 1.20 metres tall, weighs only 28 kilograms and can move at up to 3 kilometres per hour. Also, I read that¬†Pepper’s creators hope that independent developers will create new content and uses for Pepper.

Watching this video, I learned that Pepper can help us in our daily lives, for example by helping us feel welcome at a place and answering questions we have. Thinking about questions I would like to ask Pepper, the 10 questions below popped into my mind. As I think it will be quite busy during #DigitalDay, I will probably not have the possibility to ask Pepper all of them. But anyway, these are the questions I came to think of.

Question # 1: Hi Pepper, how are you feeling today?

Question # 2: Pepper, are you a man or a woman?

Question # 3: Pepper, I am curious to know in which country you were born and  in which places you grew up. Can you tell me please?

Question # 4: If you wanted to become even more like a human being, what do you think you need?

Question # 5: Pepper, I am curious to know how you learn something new. Can you give some examples of how you learn well, please?

Question # 6: Can you please tell me a little about who programmed you and how you were programmed?

Question # 7: I read that some people are afraid to lose their jobs to robots. How can you help people who have this fear in their hearts and minds?

Question # 8: If you were asked to help people discover values they have, what questions would you ask?

Question # 9: I would like to participate in brainstorming about the future of health . Can you please tell me where this brainstorming is taking place?

Question # 10: Pepper, do you think I can smile but still feel negative emotions such as sadness, fear, or anger?